Tag Archives: Government Digital Service

What should the UK’s Chief Data Officer do in their first 100 days?

Ok I am making an assumption that there is going to be a CDO but bear with me on that.

Will a CDO be the saviour of data in the UK?

Here is a starter for ten list:

  1. Work out who is responsible for data publishing and transparency – GDS (The Government Digital Service) or the Transformation Team in the Cabinet Office?
  2. Do something with data.gov.uk – a great idea but a bit like a marathon runner it seems to have hit the wall.
  3. Please sort out public sector data publishing – are central and local government working to the same standards?
  4. Give some oomph to the National Information Infrastructure, even a new name. Data is the life blood of the economy it should be sexy not boring.
  5. Mandate data registers for every public sector body as will now be the case in the US (and why not throw in the private sector as well why you are at it.)
  6. Data quality is appalling and a perennial issue – it should be everybody’s responsibility not just the person who pushes the publish button.
  7. Open, open, open – yes with the relevant caveats around privacy and security everything should be open.
  8. Education – so we are teaching coding to kids where is data in all this? Most organisations cannot function without data and data management but this is not entirely clear when you talk to public sector bodies. So education, education, education – about data.
  9. Make sure the UK stays at the top of the table for open data – but by using better metrics than the current lightweight assessments.
  10. Create a network of Chief Data Officers.

So that’s ten points written in ten minutes – what else is missing?

 

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My top ten predictions for 2015

1. 2015 will have 365 days, approximately

2. GovCamp will take place on 24 January at Microsoft

3. The Government Digital Service will employ more people

4. Some IT projects will fail

5. I will not be in the New Year’s Honours (again)

6. There will be more talk about a Local Government Digital Service – which will still come to nothing

7. Data will become big, very big; and open data will become even bigger and opener (? Ed) – the number of people really getting it will probably remain the same

8. Government digital folk will remain as great as ever, sharing, caring and doing great stuff

9. We will still detest Facebook and still keep using it and start to detest Twitter – then detest ourselves for using these tools and for being detestable

10. There will be more social media ‘disasters’ and data takeaways (by those naughty black hatters)

11. Our personal data will be shared more freely than a post on Plague

12. There will be more Buzzfeeding of content – er this list

13. People will forget how to count up to ten

 

 

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Does digital transformation really exist?

I have heard the phrase digital transformation bandied around a lot around and it made we wonder what does it actually mean?

I suspect that we all having an image in our minds when we think of digital transformation.

Does the meaning of the phrase depend on our roles and mindsets?

So if you speak to a certain group of people in central government, particularly those with links to the Government Digital Service, they might start talking about the 25 odd digital exemplar projects. Here is their list of projects on a page labelled transformation.

If you talk to someone who works in communications their idea of transformation might be killing off press releases and having a longer term relationship with audiences based around engagement and outreach.

Some of my colleagues are interested in getting rid of paper in certain meetings and they see this as digital transformation.

Or does it relate to the collection and manipulation of data?

Are these all aspects of the same thing called digital transformation or totally separate changes?

What happens if we separate out some of these words and ideas?

What does digital transformation really mean?

Is it one of these phrases a bit like the ‘industrial revolution’ which first referred to a short period of say 1780 to 1825 but then got stretched back to cover tin mining in Cornwall centuries before; and went much further into the nineteenth century. How long does transformation take? One month, one year, one decade?

Is transformation just the steady migration of functions and services into an electronic format? In theory we could probably map this and see where it is heading next. Is this process a bit like industrialisation which led to the standardisation and mechanisation of previously individual, often manual labour?

When we look at say, the exemplar projects, are these much more than the application of business process management, (Lean etc) to functions in the aim of rationalising and making them more efficient using the tools available now?

When did digital communications start to be transformed? With the introduction of the morse code, radio, telephone, television?

I’m not sure that I know the answer to the question ‘does digital transformation really exist’.

However it would be nice if the real digital transformation could stand up and reveal itself while the imposters run away.

 

 

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